Chazkeinu: Past, Present & Future

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You might know someone with mental illness. Maybe it’s you; maybe a family member or friend. But it is someone you wish to see get better. You’ve seen them suffer, even while in treatment. Perhaps you have suffered as well. You wish there was another way for them to find help and hope in the darkness. Chazkeinu was created to offer that additional support to Orthodox Jewish women living with mental illness.

Fixing Broken After Trauma (Joe Brikman)

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Joe Brikman joins us to share with us how he has come to thrive, despite adversity. As a boy, he was sexually abused by a female babysitter and at the age of 12, shortly after he told his parents, his father was diagnosed with cancer. Joe was sent off to a boarding school where, no matter his accomplishments, it seemed he could never live up to their strict expectations. This, combined with the flashbacks and issues he was dealing with, made him feel hopeless, and he attempted suicide on his 14th birthday.

Year One: Documenting Postpartum Depression (Erin Bagwell)

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When I heard Erin Bagwell share her perspective on her experience with Postpartum Depression (PPD), I knew I had to have her on the show. In this powerful and raw episode, we discuss our own experiences with mental health in early motherhood and what new moms often go through.

The Power of Affirmations (Bob Baker)

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Bob Baker has been my virtual mentor for years. I have never actually met him before, but every morning, I listen to his podcast and let him guide me in speaking affirmations over my life. He is here today to share with us his own journey to embracing affirmations. Positivity had such a huge impact on my own healing, and Bob plays a big part in keeping that going in my daily life.

Borderline Personality Disorder: The Road After Discovery (Debbie DeMarco Bennett)

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In 2010, Debbie DeMarco Bennett learned that she had borderline personality disorder, (BPD) was in and out of psychiatric hospitalizations, frequently threatening suicide, unable to keep a job and her relationships were very hot and very cold. Having grown up in the foster care system and being placed in group homes she had been working with her psychiatrist and therapist at the health organization Kaiser, where she received her diagnosis of BPD. Her psychiatrist introduced her to Dialectical Behavior Therapy, (DBT), and after she enrolled into treatment, she realized that she was not crazy, but rather, was just someone who felt deeply, intensely, and never really learned how to manage when difficulty surfaced.